Veterinary Uses for Turmeric Herb

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Always consult your veterinarian before starting any herbal supplements to make sure it’s a good choice for your pet.


Turmeric has been used in Asia for thousands of years. It was first used as a dye, and then later for its medicinal properties. The name of the genus, Curcuma, is from an Arabic name of both saffron and turmeric.
Turmeric is a warm and pungent herb. Its repertoire of clinical actions includes: anti-inflammatory/pain relief, stimulant, tonic, anthelmintic (dewormer), antioxidant, anti-platelet, liver-protective, anti-cancer, and cholesterol reducing properties.
In Ayurvedic practices, turmeric has been used to treat a variety of internal disorders, such as indigestion, throat infections, common colds or liver ailments, as well as topically to cleanse wounds or treat skin sores.
Potential veterinary usages: a paste can be applied externally to sores, wounds, bruises, bites, inflamed joints, small tumors; as a substitute for NSAIDS for pain or injury; as an adjunct of cancer treatment or prevention; arthritis, skin disease, liver disease.
Contraindications: obstruction of the biliary tract, hypersensitivity/allergy to turmeric.
The suggested dosage is approximately 15 to 20 mg per pound of body weight in dogs, 150-200 mg for cats. A simpler way of looking at it is 1/8 to a 1/4 teaspoon per day, for every 10 lbs of dog weight. Make sure your pet has lots of water to ensure that they don’t get constipated, and administer with a meal for best absorption.
Always consult your veterinarian before starting any herbal supplements to make sure it’s a good choice for your pet.
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